Abstract

The aim of this study was to examine how learning styles impact the development of 12 learning skills in higher education by using Kolb's learning theory. The results revealed that two learning abilities in the dialectical dimension of concrete experience and abstract conceptualization significantly affected development in three interpersonal and three analytical skills. However, two learning abilities in the other dialectical dimension of reflective observation and active experimentation had a marginal influence on related skill development. Further, more balanced learning styles of the freshmen sample hindered the development of three analytical skills and one perceptual skill. In conclusion, university students should learn by specializing in learning abilities to develop their concomitant learning skills except for three perceptual skills. Additionally, students should avoid learning by balancing two dialectical learning abilities, especially concrete experience and abstract conceptualization in order to develop analytical skills in higher education.